Review: Fuji XF 23mm f/1.4 R

At first glance, the 23mm f/1.4 looks like an enormous beast of a lens compared to what was (at the time of it’s release) the smaller 18mm f/2 and 35mm f/1.4 lenses. The main reason for the bulk of this lens, aside from it’s fast 1.4 aperture, was the manual focus clutch mechanism. Pulling back on this lens revealed a manual focus design with hard stops and a depth of field scale. This feature is only shared with it’s 14mm f/2.8 and 16mm f/1.4 prime brothers. I take a look at this and other features of the 23mm f/1.4 in this video.

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REVIEW: Fuji XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS Lens

If someone were to mention Fuji X-series zoom lenses, you wouldn’t be wrong to automatically start thinking at the longer range of focal lengths. Their XF 50-140mm and XF 100-400mm are some of the sharpest and most versatile mirrorless zooms around and they're very popular lenses in the Fuji lineup. The XC 50-230mm and XF 55-200mm also pack quite the punch. But at the completely different end of the spectrum, Fuji also focused some of their design prowess on creating a wide angle zoom to cover everything from landscapes to architecture to street photography. So how does this wide angle zoom, the XF 10-24mm f/4 OIS, hold up in usage?

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Sibling Rivalry: The Underestimated XC 50-230mm

There are many reviews on the internet about Fuji's well known XF zooms: the 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 and the 50-140mm f/2.8. I've even posted a recent review of the red-badged professional grade XF 50-140mm myself and noted its amazing quality, but you'd be hard pressed to find as much information about a third sibling in Fuji's lineup: the XC 50-230mm f/4.5-6.7. Labeled as a cheaper consumer product, this lens is often overlooked in favor of its two older brothers. Like most younger brothers who strive to compete with their older brothers, the XC 50-230mm packs a surprising combination of size, weight and immense reach that not even the 50-140mm can match. 

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Review: Fuji XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR Lens

The 50-140mm f/2.8 lens is perhaps one of the most impressive lenses in the entire Fuji X-Mount lineup. This red-badged XF zoom combines impressive construction quality with outstanding optics, but it’s not without its quirks. I rented this lens as part of the Fuji Professional Rental Service and got to spend a few weeks testing it out. Read on to hear my thoughts!

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An Unscientific Look at Fuji OIS

OIS stands for Optical Image Stabilization, a technology found in a few of the Fuji XF lenses that have been released to date. I decided I’d do a real quick test just to see how well the OIS performs on the Fuji XF 55-200mm lens. I’ll warn you now: the test is absolutely unscientific, consisting of me lounging in the backyard of my in-laws house in Florida while handholding the lens at a few static objects about a foot or two away from me. I wanted to see just how much flipping this switch was actually doing for these images.

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Zooms vs. Primes: Round 2

It was the holy trinity of Panasonic zoom lenses: the 12-35mm f/2.8, the 35-100mm f/2.8 and the 100-300mm f/4.0 - 5.6. Between the three of them, I was covered by the full frame equivalent of 24mm - 600mm, and it was fantastic to shoot with them. No matter what the situation called for, I was set! But then something unexpected happened. With a new VFX editing job sucking away any free time that I could previously dedicate to photography, I had very few opportunities to take this kit out and use it to it’s full advantage. Suddenly I fell into a rut, and the only thing that got me back up and shooting was a newfound interest in my new 35mm film cameras…and the primes that came with them.

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The Long Shot: Zooms vs. Primes

Should I use a zoom lens or a prime lens? It's a question that many photography sites and blogs have covered at one point or another, and its usually answered one of two ways: either they recommend that you use what's best for your type of photography or that primes are somehow the decisive type of lens to use if you’re a “serious” photographer. it’s this second answer that leaves me shaking my head.

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